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Aging Dietary Supplementation Healthcare Nutrition

Vitamin Deficiency In The Golden Years

4 months, 1 week ago

1362  0
Posted on Feb 09, 2018, 11 a.m.

An investigation was conducted by researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, that has been published in Nutrients, suggesting that one in two individuals aged 65 and above will have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, and that one in four older adults will have suboptimal levels of vitamin B12. This research was part of the KORA-Age study.

 

An investigation was conducted by researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, that has been published in Nutrients, suggesting that one in two individuals aged 65 and above will have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, and that one in four older adults will have suboptimal levels of vitamin B12. This research was part of the KORA-Age study.

 

The KORA Cooperative Health Research platform has been examining the health of thousand of individuals for over 30 years. With the main objective of the research being to help to better understand the impacts of lifestyle factors, environmental factors, and genes on health. Researchers were also interested in the examination of the miconutrientional status of the older adults, in which research data was low on.

 

Blood samples were examined by scientist from 1,079 older adults in the age grouping of 65 to 93 years old who were part of the KORA study. Analysis was focused on the levels of 4 micronutrients which were iron, vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B12.

 

Findings were that 52% of the older adults had suboptimal levels of vitamin D having below 50 nmo/L. Shortages of similar results were also observed with regards to some of the other micronutrients. 27% of the older adults had vitamin B12 levels that were below the cut off point. 11% of the older adults had low iron levels, and 9% had low levels of folate. Professor Annette Peters says this revealed an insufficient intake of micronutrients from food consumption. The older adults with the suboptimal vitamin levels all had in common that they were elderly, frail, and physically inactive.

 

The study shows special care should be taken with these groups of people with a higher risk of micronutriental deficiencies, and that the regular intake of vitamin containing supplements goes along with improving the levels of the respected vitamins and minerals.

 

The next objective of the researchers is the continued investigation of the metabolic pathways that link with supplement intake, disease states, and micronutrient status.

 

Materials provided by Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Romy Conzade, Wolfgang Koenig, Margit Heier, Andrea Schneider, Eva Grill, Annette Peters, Barbara Thorand. Prevalence and Predictors of Subclinical Micronutrient Deficiency in German Older Adults: Results from the Population-Based KORA-Age Study. Nutrients, 2017; 9 (12): 1276 DOI: 10.3390/nu9121276

 

 

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