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Behavior Cardio-Vascular

Smoking can reshape heart

9 years, 5 months ago

285  0
Posted on Nov 18, 2008, 7 a.m. By Rich Hurd

Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke increases levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine and activates enzymes that have the potential to reshape the left ventricle of the heart, say researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke increases levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine and activates enzymes  that have the potential to reshape the left ventricle of the heart, say researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The study on rats revealed that five weeks exposure to cigarette smoke led to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) a class of enzymes that controls the growth and survival of heart muscle cells. Echocardiography showed that exposure to cigarette smoke had caused significant changes to the left ventricle, a process known as left ventricular remodeling. In addition, there was also evidence of systolic dysfunction. Further tests showed that the animals also had increased levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine, which can cause a number of physiological changes, in their urine.

Gua L, Pandeya V, Geenenb DL, Chowdhuryb SAK, Pianoa MR. Cigarette smoke-induced left ventricular remodelling is associated with activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. European Journal of Heart Failure. 2008;10:1057-1064.

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